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Category: Cambodia

Behind The Blog

Behind The Blog

As our three months in Asia nears a close, it seems it’s about time for another behind the scenes peek at life on the road. 49 blogs and 6 countries later, the second leg of our trip is about in the books, and it’s mindboggling to think we’ve been gone for over six months now! Let us now take a moment to celebrate our successes by sharing some of our [not so] finer moments:   Some of our lavish transportation…

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Fast Facts: Cambodia

Fast Facts: Cambodia

WHAT WE DID: Spent two weeks at guesthouses: Siem Reap (5 days) Transit – bus from Siem Reap to Phnom Penh Phnom Penh (4 days) Transit – bus from Phnom Penh to Kampot Kampot (5 days)   WHAT WE LIKED: Siem Reap was probably our favorite place, and not just for Angkor. The people were incredibly friendly, the food was wicked cheap (sometimes only $1.50 for a meal), the guesthouses were an unbelievable value, and the area was really bicycle-friendly…

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Penny & Me

Penny & Me

Although minted in 1988, for me the penny’s brief, known history begins on April 15, 2013 – the day of the Boston Marathon bombing. My brother plucked the penny from a downtown Boston sidewalk shortly before the attacks took place and, thankfully, both the coin and he were able to escape unscathed from the terror that rapidly developed before them. Three years later, this little symbol of good fortune stops for a rest within a verdant patch of grass, its…

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Kep

Kep

Kep is a quiet, coastal province just southeast of Kampot, which seems to be known chiefly for its seafood and the abundance of small, beachside resorts that dot the coastline. Signs as far away as Kampot city announced the direction to Kep Beach, so it was with some amusement that we discovered it to be a tiny strip of seaweed-laden sand only a few feet from the road. We cruised up the coastal road, discovering a number of pleasant ways…

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Kampot

Kampot

About 150 km southwest of the busy city of Phnom Penh sits the coastal town of Kampot. Renowned for its pepper farms, Kampot’s weather and mineral-rich soil create the perfect growing conditions for peppercorns. Jenn was excited to visit the pepper farms, and after some investigation online, I had found a wonderful little guesthouse called Ganesha Eco Resort, where we could stay outside of town. The eco resort consisted of a small handful of bamboo-and-grass huts, some perched on the…

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A Heartbreaking History

A Heartbreaking History

Foreword: The following narrative details some events of the Cambodian Genocide. I struggled a lot with what to write, how to write… and even if to write about the immense tragedy and what we saw. Ultimately, I decided to share our experience below. Visiting the memorial sites taught both of us more than we’d ever imagined about the tragic events, and we thought that, although disheartening and raw, sharing what we learned may help others to better appreciate Cambodia’s somber…

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Eight-legged Entrées in Phnom Penh

Eight-legged Entrées in Phnom Penh

Our journey to Phnom Penh was quick and painless. A private bus company called Giant Ibis operates in Cambodia, running a spotless and efficient bus service. With online ticket purchasing and seat selection, quiet, comfortable and modern busses with power outlets, real air conditioning, and no stinky bathroom perfuming the last several rows, the trip felt like luxury. Upon disembarking our tranquil chariot, though, we were immediately overwhelmed by what would become a staple of our Phnom Penh stay –…

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The Roluos Group

The Roluos Group

About 15 km east of Siem Reap sits a small cluster of temples known as the Roluos Group (named for their proximity to the town of the same name). The three temples were constructed at the end of the 9th century, predating any built at Angkor, and are some of the oldest Khmer ruins in the area. The largest of the group, the state temple of Bakong was dedicated in 881 to the god Shiva, and is considered the first…

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Angkor Wat

Angkor Wat

Undoubtedly Angkor’s most recognized temple, Angkor Wat is the largest religious monument in the world and one of Cambodia’s most revered sites. Stretching 1.5 km east to west, and 1.3 km north to south, Angkor Wat covers some 200 hectares (494 acres). Constructed in the early 12th century (1113–1150) under King Suryavarman II, the massive state temple was dedicated to Vishnu, the protector of life and moral order. The overall design conforms to that of the traditional Khmer temple mountain…

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Angkor

Angkor

Established as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1992, Angkor, the ancient capital city of the Khmer Kingdom, is a sprawling expanse of about 400 square kilometers (154 mi2), just north of Siem Reap and southeast Asia’s largest freshwater lake, Tonlé Sap. The site encompasses dozens of Khmer ruins, dating back to between the 9th and 15th centuries, tucked in amongst forests and farmland. Although constructed over the course of several centuries, many aspects of the Khmer architecture and religious…

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